Sociologist, local councillor, activist from Malta

Friday, December 03, 2010

2 new published papers on environmental sociology in Malta

Dear Friends,

I would like to inform you of the publication of the following 2 peer-reviewed papers (abstracts below):


1. Briguglio, Michael (2010). ‘Are ENGOs empowered through EU accession? The case of Maltese ENGOs’, International Journal of Green Economics, 4: 3, 262-274

2. Briguglio, Michael and Aquilina, Diana (2010). ‘The Social Impact of Liberalisation of Plastic Bottles in Malta’, International Journal of Green Economics, 4: 3, 275-291


1. Are ENGOs empowered through EU accession? The case of Maltese ENGOs: Malta joined the European Union in 2004 and carried out vast changes in its environmental legislation during the process. Environmental NGOs have been key actors in this regard. This paper verifies whether Malta’s EU accession has helped empower such organisations. The paper argues that EU Accession has enhanced empowerment of ENGOs. This has occurred as a result of EU-driven policy and legislative reforms, leading to the institutionalisation of various ENGOs – especially if conservationist, but not if local or radical - through their participation in environmental reform. In addition, lobbying opportunities for ENGOs within EU Institutions have increased. However various factors constrain the ENGOs' empowerment, including neo-liberal ideology; political pressure from other lobby groups; and economic pressures. It should be qualified that empowerment has effected ENGOs differently, with conservationists gaining most, followed by sustainable development, radical and local ENGOs respectively.


2. The Social Impact of Liberalisation of Plastic Bottles in Malta:
This paper analyzes the social impact of liberalisation of plastic bottles in Malta, wherein the system of returnable glass bottles has effectively been replaced by a system of disposable plastic bottles. The paper applies concepts such as Ulrich Beck’s (1992) ‘risk society’, and Michael Cahill’s (1994) ‘consumer society’ to the issue under research. A quantitative survey administered in two Maltese localities shows that whilst there is a wide-ranging opposition towards the plastic bottles system, at the same time, most respondents are not ready to make financial contributions for a better environment. Such perceptions are compared with those of European counterparts.

http://malta.academia.edu/MichaelBriguglio

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